Evolve Board Bushing Box

  • RipTide Sports Evolve Bushing Kit
  • RipTide Sports Evolve Bushing Kit Closup
tracey@riptidesports.com

Description

Backfire Ranger 2 setup

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4.  Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair.

 

Front truck

F1:  KranK 90a Cone (.6" tall)

F2:  KranK 90a Barrel (.6" tall)

F3:  KranK 96a StreetBarrel with flat washer for clearance (.5" tall)

F4:  KranK 96a Barrel (.6" tall)

 

Rear Truck

R1:  KranK 96a Cone (.6" tall)

R2:  KranK 96a Barrel (.6" tall)

R3:  KranK 96a StreetBarrel with flat washer for clearance (.5" tall)

R4:  KranK 96a Barrel (.6" tall)

 

For reference, I weigh just about 200 lbs and this worked well for me as well as my son that weighs 140 lbs.  We found the key to settling down your trucks is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2).  The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted.  We found that the way Backfire had the rear set up, the secondary pair turned before the primary pair due to the stiffer shape of the Barrel in position R1.  I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks.  The way we have it setup provides agility and stability.  Also, our Indy Pivot cups fit the trucks perfectly.

EVOLVE setup

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4. Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair.

Front truck

F1: KranK 90a ShortStreetCone (.4" tall)

F2: KranK 90a Barrel (.6" tall)

F3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall)

F4: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall)

Rear Truck

R1: KranK 93a ShortStreetCone or ShortStreetBarrel if you want more stability(.4" tall)

R2: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall)

R3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall)

R4: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall)

I weigh just about 200 lbs and this worked well for me as well as my son that weighs 140 lbs. We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks. The way we have it setup provides agility and stability.

There are some options also for even higher stability if you want to go that route. The main options are for Positions F1 and R1 using a ShortStreetBarrel with a small flat washer and F4 use a FatCone and R4 use a Chubby in the same duros for the positions above.

 

Looking forward to hearing from you soon

METROBOARDS setup:

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4. Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair.

Front truck

F1: KranK 90a ShortStreetCone or ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall)

F2: KranK 90a StreetBarrel (.5" tall)

F3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall)

F4: KranK 93a StreetFatCone (.5" tall)

Rear Truck

R1: KranK 93a ShortStreetCone or ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall)

R2: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall)

R3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall)

R4: KranK 93a StreetChubby (.5" tall)

We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks.

I weigh just about 200 lbs and this worked well for me as well as my son that weighs 140 lbs. We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks. The way we have it setup provides agility and stability. 

 

Changed F4 and R4 to StreetFatCone and StreetChubby respectively 04/29/2020

 

MILES RAMPAGE VERSION

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4. Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair.

Front truck

F1: KranK 90a StreetBarrel (.5" tall)

F2: KranK 90a Barrel (.6" tall)

F3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.5" tall)

F4: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall)

Rear Truck

R1: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall)

R2: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall)

R3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.5" tall)

R4: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall)

We found the key to settling down DKP trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer or more compressed than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. When adjusting compression, start with the boardside pairs

I weigh just about 200 lbs and this worked well for me as well as my son that weighs 140 lbs. We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks. The way we have it setup provides agility and stability. 

modified 05/13/20 F3 and R3 changed from Street to ShortStreet

 

Ownboard bamboo with DKP trucks

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4. Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair. This setup will work for someone 140 to 220 lbs in most cases by adjusting the king pin nut pressure.

Front truck

F1: KranK 90a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with small flat washer

F2: KranK 90a Barrel (.6" tall) with cup washer

F3: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with small flat washer

F4: KranK 93a FatCone (.6" tall) with large flat washer

Rear Truck

R1: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with small flat washer

R2: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall) with cup washer

R3: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with small flat washer

R4: KranK 93a Chubby (.6" tall) with large flat washer

We found the key to settling down DKP trucks for agility and high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer or more compressed than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. When adjusting compression, start with the boardside R3 and R4 first

We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks. The way we have it setup provides agility and stability. 

 

Gullwing sidewinder version

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4. Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair. This setup will work for someone 140 to 200 lbs in most cases.

Front truck

F1: KranK 90a ShortStreetCone (.4" tall) with cup washer

F2: KranK 90a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with flat washer

F3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall) with small flat washer

F4: KranK 93a or StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with cup washer

Rear Truck

R1: KranK 93a ShortStreetCone (.4" tall) with cup washer

R2: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with flat washer

R3: KranK 93a ShortStreetBarrel (.4" tall) with small falt washer

R4: KranK 93a StreetBarrel (.5" tall) with cup washer

We found the key to settling down DKP trucks for agility and high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer or more compressed than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. When adjusting compression, start with the boardside R3 and R4 first

I weigh just about 200 lbs and this worked well for me as well as my son that weighs 140 lbs. We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks. The way we have it setup provides agility and stability. 

 

Verreal RS version

For simplicity, I will refer to the bushing positions from roadside to boardside so for the front, F1 is the bushing closest to the road in the front and F4 is the bushing closest to the deck in the front, rear will be the same just designated R1-R4. Also, the position 1-2 are the primary turning pair and position 3-4 are the secondary turning pair. This setup will work for someone 140 to 200 lbs in most cases.

Front truck

F1: KranK 90a Barrel (.6" tall) with small flat washer

F2: KranK 90a Barrel (.6" tall) with cup washer

F3: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall) with small flat washer

F4: KranK 93a FatCone (.6" tall) with large flat washer

Rear Truck

R1: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall) with small flat washer

R2: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall) with cup washer

R3: KranK 93a Barrel (.6" tall) with small flat washer

R4: KranK 93a Chubby (.6" tall) with large flat washer

We found the key to settling down DKP trucks for agility and high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer or more compressed than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. When adjusting compression, start with the boardside R3 and R4 first

I weigh just about 200 lbs and this worked well for me as well as my son that weighs 140 lbs. We found the key to settling down the trucks for high speed situations is to keep the pair of bushings closest to the deck (F3-4 and R3-4) stiffer than the bushings closer to the road (F1-2 and R1-2) and the front easier to turn than the rear. The primary pair should initiate the turn, then the secondary pair should come into play when needed or wanted. I hope this is not too confusing as there is a lot going on with these trucks. The way we have it setup provides agility and stability. 

 

 

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